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Posts Tagged ‘Confession and Absolution’

1. Lord, to Thee I make confession;

I have sinned and gone astray,
I have multiplied transgression,
Chosen for myself my way,
Led by Thee to see my errors,
Lord, I tremble at Thy terrors.

2. Yet, though conscience’ voice appall me,
Father, I will seek Thy face;
Though Thy child I dare not call me,
Yet receive me to Thy grace.
Do not for my sins forsake me;
Do not let Thy wrath o’ertake me.

3. For Thy Son did suffer for me,
Gave Himself to rescue me,
Died to heal me and restore me,
Reconciled me unto Thee.
‘Tis alone His cross can vanquish
These dark fears and soothe this anguish.

4. Then on Him I cast my burden,
Sink it in the depths below.
Let me know Thy gracious pardon,
Wash me, make me white as snow.
Let Thy Spirit leave me never;
Make me only Thine forever.

Hymn #326
The Lutheran Hymnal
Text: Ps 139: 7-10
Author: Johann Franck, 1649, cento
Translated by: Catherine Winkworth, 1863, alt.
Titled: “Herr, ich habe missgehandelt”
Composer: Johann Crueger, 1649
Tune: “Herr, ich habe missgehandelt”

Note:  this hymn study is not of the music since I am musically illiterate!  This is a study of the hymn’s words as they reflect confessionally the Scriptures for our edification.

About Johann Franck:  He ranks second only to Paul Gerhardt (Lutheran Service Book, LSB, #334, # 360, etc) as a hymnwriter, was one of the writers who marked the transition from the objective German “church song” to a more personal and mystical kind of poetry, yet Franck’s hymns  are based on  the solid rock of God’s  Word of Law and Promise, as we can read and sing in his hymn above. He was also a writer of secular poetry of some renown during his time, but it is his hymns, finished in form and of earnest faith and simplicity, that have survived. Of these he wrote 110. Franck’s most known  hymns are both in  Lutheran Service Book (LSB):   #636, “Soul, Adorn Thyself with Gladness and #743, “Jesus, Priceless Treasure”.  

Born June 1, 1618, at Guben, Brandenburg, Germany, Franck was two years old when his father died and he was adopted by an uncle. He received his education at the University of Konigsberg, the only German university not disrupted by the Thirty Years’ War. There he formed a friendship with Simon Dach and Heinrich Held (LSB #352). He became a lawyer, as was his father, and after some travel, returned to Guben, where he became a councillor, a mayor, and finally a representative of the province to the Diet of Lower Lusatia. He died June 18, 1677. (adapted from Hymnal Companion to the Lutheran Book of Worship, Augsburg-Fortress Publishing).

LSB lists these Scripture passages as the basis of “Lord, to You I Make Confession’:

  • Psalm 51: 5-11
  • 2 Corinthians 5: 18-20
  • Isaiah 59: 12
  • Psalm 32: 5

The Lutheran Confessions summarize Confession and Absolution,as taught in the Scriptures and the texts above:

 Now, repentance consists properly of these   two parts:  One is contrition, that is,  terrors smiting the conscience through the knowledge of sin; the other is faith, which is born of  the Gospel, or of absolution, and believes that for Christ’s sake, sins are forgiven, comforts  the conscience, and delivers it from terrors. Then good works are bound to follow, which are the fruits of repentance. (Augsburg Confession, Article XII: Of Repentence)

 Franck’s hymn is precisely what every Christian knows:  contrition, sorrow over sin leads the Christian to seek in faith in Christ to  taking hold of His forgiveness, the Absolution, the Word of promise, by Christ’s Work and Word, after the terror over sin from God’s just judgment:

 “Led by Thee to see my errors,
Lord, I tremble at Thy terrors”.

We do not know what Franck’s precise sin(s) that prompted him to write this hymn.  Does it matter?  He did not make his confession, as many do today in the courts of public opinion to be accepted by  sinful suspect culture.  This kind of ‘confession’ is simply a continuation into sin:  

I have multiplied transgression,
Chosen for myself my way.

It is man seeking his own way. There is only One who can forgive and  to be forgiven in the courts of the Lord’s House:  Christ.  Absolution does not come from the Gallup polls but by God’s promise alone fulfilled in His Son.  “I can’t forgive myself”:  that’s right.  Advising someone to forgive themselves is choosing one’s own way, going the wrong way, back into the sinful heart, not outward to the Lord and the only Way of mercy.  Johann’s  confession was between himself and his confessor. The confessor would have been  authorized by Christ to be Johann’s pastor to speak God’s Word of freedom into his ears into his fearful heart.  Johann Franck did not even claim to be God’s child with proprietary rights supposedly entitling him to forgiveness:

Though Thy child I dare not call me,
Yet receive me to Thy grace.

Implied in that stanza that it was the Lord Himself who so claimed him as a child and you as well, by His grace alone.  He did so for all to see, and for thee  upon the Cross.  

For Thy Son did suffer for me,
Gave Himself to rescue me,
Died to heal me and restore me,
Reconciled me unto Thee.
‘Tis alone His cross can vanquish
These dark fears and soothe this anguish.

 Then on Him I cast my burden,
Sink it in the depths below.
Let me know Thy gracious pardon,
Wash me, make me white as snow.
Let Thy Spirit leave me never;
Make me only Thine forever.

It is a shame that  our hymnals no longer include the sung Amen as they once did. Nevertheless:

♫Amen♫

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Johann von Staupitz (ca. 1469–1524), was vicar-general of the Augustinian Order in Germany and friend of Martin Luther, was born in Saxony. He studied at the universities in Leipzig and Cologne and served on the faculty at Cologne. In 1503 he was called by Frederick the Wise to serve as dean of the theological faculty at the newly founded University of Wittenberg. There he encouraged Luther to attain a doctorate in theology and appointed Luther as his successor to professor of Bible. During Luther’s early struggles to understand God’s grace, it was Staupitz who counseled Luther to focus on Christ and not on himself. (The Treasury of Daily Prayer, CPH)

Reflection:  When the publication of the 95 Theses spread throughout Europe, then Luther was in middle of a raging storm.  He corresponded with his father confessor.

On the twenty-fifth of November he sent word to Staupitz:

I am expecting the curses of Rome any day. I have everything in readiness. When they come, I am girded like Abraham to go I know not where, but sure of this, that God is everywhere.

Staupitz wrote Luther from  Austria:

The world hates the truth. By such hate Christ was crucified, and what there is in store for you today if not the cross I do not know. You have few friends, and would that they were not hidden for fear of the adversary. Leave Wittenberg and come to me that we may live and die together. The prince [Frederick] is in accord. Deserted let us follow the deserted Christ. (From Here I Stand by Roland Bainton)

Up until his death, Fr. von Staupitz, wrote to Luther and he to him.  We do not know if Luther’s dear father superior ever accepted the evangelical doctrine but he sure seems to have known them and lived them.  

It is written in Proverbs 17: 17:

A friend loves at all times,
   and a brother is born for adversity.

And from Proverbs, 18: 24:

A man of many companions may come to ruin,
   but there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.

Fr. Staupitz epitomized those Scripture passages.  In The Smalcald Articles, of the Lutheran Confessions, Part III, Article IV, “Of the Gospel”, Father Luther confesses the 4 ways the Lord gives us the Gospel: 1.  the Preaching of the Word;  2. Baptism;  3. the Sacrament of the Altar; 4. “through the power of the keys, and also through the mutual conversation and consolation of brethren, Matt. 18:20: Where two or three are gathered together, etc.” (emphasis added).  The power of the keys, or absolution, are linked with “the mutual conversation and consolation of brethren” and rightly so, as the Lord did, recorded in Matthew 18.  I can only opine that Luther was taught this in the school of Holy Spirit, partly at least, because of his Father confessor.  Staupitz was obviously Luther’s mentor and with that Luther’s  friend and brother in Christ.

This is a good commemoration to thank and remember mentors in our lives, who have been closer than a brother and a brother born for adversity and hung in there with you.  A brother who has heard your soul’s confession and offered Christ’s absolution as did von Staupitz. All the Facebook friends in the world do not one dear brother in Christ Jesus make.  Between Martin and Johannes stood Jesus Christ and the dear Father Johannes showed Martin Jesus Christ so that Martin could see Him in the clear Word of Scripture.  “Lord, keep us steadfast in Your Word”, penned and sang Luther.  He probably knew he was kept steadfast by his dear father confessor as a mentor has so done for you.  Fr. Staupitz knew the Word as he had been fully known (1 Corinthians 13:12).

Almighty, everlasting God, for our many sins we justly deserve eternal condemnation.  In Your mercy, You sent Your dear Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, who won for us forgiveness of sins and everlasting salvation.  Grant us a true confession so that dead to sin we may hear  the sweet  words of Absolution from our confessor as Luther heard them from his pastor, Johannes von Staupitz, and be released from all our sin;  through Jesus Christ, our lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

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The title quote above, “Giving Up Selfies for Lent”, was the sermon title for Lent 1 at the large Methodist church across the street from the library where the mission meets.  

Now I suspect that the preacher was not simply talking about the new practice of using cell phone cameras and taking pictures of yourself, usually with your friends.  Giving up selfies one can do (but then again…).  Maybe the preacher used it as example of the need of giving up the self for Lent.  If so, what about the other 325 days of the year?   

The Lord does not teach about “giving up selfies/self”, but denying the self and finally it, the self, the Old Adam, needs to be killed, crucified, (Matthew 16:24)  and buried and raised.  It has been in Baptism:  see Romans 6:3-5 and Colossians 2:11-13;   Galatians 2:20. The Apostle’s encouragement is,

” So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus. (Romans 6:11)

When the rich young man( Matthew 19: 16-26) wanted to follow Jesus, the Lord said to him,  Sell all that you have and come follow Me.  And the rich young man went away sorrowful for he was rich. He, we, all tenaciously hold  on to the self by virtue of the number 1 idol on earth, wealth. He couldn’t crucify that passion but Jesus could and did.  As He said the disciples, With God all things are possible.

Saying that I gave up “selfies” or whatever is just watered down law.  The return to Baptism is confession.  To say we have no sin is to deceive ourselves, but if we confess our sins, God who is faithful and just and will forgive our sin.  (1 John 1:  8-11).  Confession is done in three ways:  private prayer, public prayer of confession in the Liturgy and one on one with your pastor, but it is one Word of confession and absolution which kills the sin and makes you alive in Christ. 

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In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes. (Judges 21: 25, the last verse of Judges)

All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all. (Isaiah 53: 6)

In an article,  In Martin Luther’s Church the Pastor Asks: Where Have All the Protestants Gone?”, a German Lutheran pastor, Pr. Block,  states that during the time of Communism the churches were fuller then in Germany than today and he offers this explanation:

“Belonging to the church meant taking a stand, to say, ‘This is what I believe in and I take the consequences.’ Today people think, I’m lord of my own life, why do I need the church? 

The hymn “Lord to Thee I make confession” , the first verse is above in the clip-art, (Lutheran Service Book, #608) is from the 17th Century. The penitent’s sin is choosing for himself his way, disregarding the way of the Lord for him and to him.  Looking at the hymn verse and the Bible passages above, the only incorrect portion of Pastor Block’s quote is the implication that somehow this is new…and to say in times of temporal peace, I believe in the Lord, is still to take the consequences.

 Just read an article today that people have a hard time saying, “no” nowadays.  Again, we always have but maybe there is something to the fact it’s harder these days:  we all want to be liked and the moral compass of God’s Law is denied.  Pastors are not to say “no” any longer but be “affirming”…which ends up affirming wrong and that is not serving the neighbor in love.  

We all have gone the wrong way or tend to, go “my way”.  Reading novels, bios of famous people, people I have known, looking into the mirror of the Law of God and when the way is my own choosing, it is a dead end.   The Lord puts up the sign of His terrors to stop us in His Law:

Then He shows us the sign of our forgiveness that we repent in Him, as He has borne each and every wrong of each and every one us, as He calls us  by name, John 10:3:

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In our neck of the woods, near the Blue Ridge Mountains, we just had over a foot of snow, and in many necks of the woods!  Even though we live near mountains, snow of that quantity is rare in the Old Dominion. The following quote is from the website The Federalist.  It’s from an article entitled, The Six Best Bible Verses on Snow by Mollie Hemingway (Baptized member of The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod and frequent contributor to the WSJ and other magazines and websites).  

Psalm 51:6-7:

Behold, You desire truth in the inward parts,
And in the hidden part You will make me to know wisdom.

Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

For context, David had spied Bathsheba bathing on the rooftop. Even though she was the wife of one of his senior advisors, he seduced her and impregnated her. And then he killed her husband Uriah to cover it all up. God sent the Prophet Nathan to David to confront him with his sin and this is part of the beautiful psalm he wrote after confessing his sin. If you’ve stopped pretending you’re not a sinner, it’s a great passage to read.

P.S.  It’s also great to pray when you have no pretense that you are not a sinner, as we will pray the Psalm in it’s entirety on Ash Wednesday, March 5th.–Pr. Schroeder

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In the first centuries of the Church, after Ascension and Pentecost, when a person was reborn a Christian in the waters of Holy Baptism, she left the futile ways of her forefathers. She ceased being a pagan. She ceased being an idolater worshiping many gods and began to worship the true and living God who sent His Son into the world to save us in this world for the life of the world to come.  (1 Peter 1:17-191 Thessalonians 1:8-10;   1 Corinthians 6: 9-11) 

Worship was and is the line of demarcation between the world and the life of the world to come.  In the Orthodox Church, their liturgy begins

Blessed is the kingdom of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, now and forever and to the ages of ages.

Crossing the border from the world as it is into world as is shall be, the Kingdom coming into the world through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.  The foretaste of the reign of God first accomplished by Him, when the People of Israel crossed the Jordan, after bondage in Egypt, and 40 years of the journey through the desert into the land of Promise:  crossing the Jordan.

At a border, there is a border check, customs.  In many countries, as our own, a visitor, or a returning citizen cannot bring in contraband, items considered dangerous to the welfare of the nation.    We have a border check in the Lutheran Church called Confession and Absolution, which begins the Divine Service. “Absolution” is from the word “absolve” and its synonym is “forgiveness”.  But I think it is important, even crucial,  to use “absolution” because His absolution is absolute, as real as the nails piercing His sinless hands and feet for your purification.

In the Old Testament, when Isaiah saw the Lord in glory, Isaiah cried out I am a man of unclean lips.  He knew he could not so stand in the Presence with such a dangerous tongue.  The Lord purified Isaiah.  (Isaiah 6: 4-8) As it was to Israel, sin is dangerous to the welfare of His Church, which is, “…a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.”  (1 Peter 2: 9) We lay aside the sin that so easily entangles our selves, our families, the various countries the Church dwells at the confessional border crossing.  (Hebrews 12:1-3He disentangled us not easily in His crucifixion. He frees us in His forgiveness to live as freed citizens of the Kingdom of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

When I went in the ‘70s to Eastern Europe and the then Soviet Union, on a  trip from Concordia Senior College, as we crossed from Poland into the USSR in the dead of night, the train was stopped to change the undercarriage of the train because Poland had a different track gate.  It was a convenient time for the Soviet soldiers to come on board, with automatic weapons, to rifle through our baggage, lift up our compartments seats and look us over.

  • A pastor is no Soviet border guard!  The Lord already has found you out and does so to find you in His all-encompassing forgiveness. He found you out in His Law, from Him no secrets are hid, nothing we can hide.  We cannot bring the dearest souvenir of hell into heaven. This is why we begin with Confession and Absolution.
  • A pastor’s vocation is also to hear private confession, when the burden is great for the penitent.  A pastor’s vocation is to hear confession but not to talk at all about what he has heard.  He is not tell anyone about the confession’s content, even his wife, so that you may again live as the Lord’s freed citizen, His son or daughter.
  • When the Israelites crossed the Jordan the first thing they were commanded to do was celebrate the Passover, and we do in the once and for all Passover of the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world: This is My Body, this is My Blood.  The Lord Jesus has so commanded the new Passover for the forgiveness of sins, in communion with Him and His people.

Confession and Absolution is crossing the boundary, the Jordan and it is a return to the forgiveness granted in Holy Baptism, the washing and regeneration in the Word, the Lord’s Name, Father, Son and Holy Spirit (St. Matthew 28:18-20).  This is why the sign of the cross is encouraged at the beginning of Confession and Absolution with the Invocation, In the Name of the Father, and of the +Son and of the Holy Spirit, because it is in His Name we are baptized.  Further, it is encouraged that Confession and Absolution be led from the Baptismal Font.   We see this in Dr. Luther’s ordering in The Small and Large Catechisms:  his explanation of Holy Baptism is followed immediately by the doctrine of Confession and Absolution.  From The Large Catechism:

…here you see that Baptism, both in its power and signification, comprehends also the third Sacrament, which has been called repentance, (i.e. Confession and Absolution) as it is really nothing else than Baptism. For what else is repentance but an earnest attack upon the old man [that his lusts be restrained] and entering upon a new life? Therefore, if you live in repentance, you walk in Baptism, which not only signifies such a new life, but also produces, begins, and exercises it. For therein are given grace, the Spirit, and power to suppress the old man, so that the new man may come forth and become strong.

Almighty God, by our baptism into the death and resurrection
of your Son Jesus Christ, you turn us from the old life of sin:
Grant that we, being reborn to new life in him, may live in
righteousness and holiness all our days; through Jesus Christ
our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Addendum:

The sections from Luther’s Small Catechism are reproduced below from The Book of Concord website.

IV. The Sacrament of Holy Baptism

As the head of the family should teach it in a simple way to his household.

First.

What is Baptism?–Answer.

Baptism is not simple water only, but it is the water comprehended in God’s command and connected with God’s Word.

Which is that word of God?–Answer.

Christ, our Lord, says in the last chapter of Matthew: Go ye into all the world and teach all nationsbaptizing them in the name of the Fatherand of the Sonand of the Holy Ghost.

Secondly.

What does Baptism give or profit?–Answer.

It works forgiveness of sins, delivers from death and the devil, and gives eternal salvation to all who believe this, as the words and promises of God declare.

Which are such words and promises of God? Answer.

Christ, our Lord, says in the last chapter of Mark: He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned.

 Thirdly.

How can water do such great things?–Answer.

It is not the water indeed that does them, but the word of God which is in and with the water, and faith, which trusts such word of God in the water. For without the word of God the water is simple water and no baptism. But with the word of God it is a baptism, that is, a gracious water of life and a washing of regeneration in the Holy Ghost, as St. Paul says, Titus, chapter three: By the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Ghostwhich He shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christour Saviorthatbeing justified by His gracewe should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life. This is afaithful saying.

Fourthly.

What does such baptizing with water signify?–Answer.

It signifies that the old Adam in us should, by daily contrition and repentance, be drowned and die with all sins and evil lusts, and, again, a new man daily come forth and arise; who shall live before God in righteousness and purity forever.

Where is this written?–Answer.

St. Paul says Romans, chapter 6We are buried with Christ by Baptism into deaththatlike as He was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father,even so we also should walk in newness of life.


V. Confession

How Christians should be taught to confess.

What is Confession?*

Confession embraces two parts: the one is, that we confess our sins; the other, that we receive absolution, or forgiveness, from the confessor, as from God Himself, and in no wise doubt, but firmly believe, that our sins are thereby forgiven before God in heaven.

What sins should we confess?

Before God we should plead guilty of all sins, even of those which we do not know, as we do in the Lord’s Prayer. But before the confessor we should confess those sins alone which we know and feel in our hearts.

Which are these?

Here consider your station according to the Ten Commandments, whether you are a father, mother, son, daughter, master, mistress, a man-servant or maid-servant; whether you have been disobedient, unfaithful, slothful; whether you have grieved any one by words or deeds; whether you have stolen, neglected, or wasted aught, or done other injury.

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“Ring around a rosy, a pocket full of posy, ashes, ashes we all fall down”.  I have heard the following interpretation of this nursery rhyme before but I have not verified it and yet it sounds sadly plausible.  From the Yahoo website:  “They say that it started in the Middle Ages when the Black Plague was rampant. The ‘ring around the rosy’ referred to the marks that showed up on people’s bodies, and the ‘pocket full of posies’ means the nosegays people would hold up to their noses to block out the stench of the dead. As we all know, the next line is ‘Ashes, ashes, we all fall down’, meaning that so many died, it seemed as if everyone would ‘fall down dead.’”   And then the bodies would be burnt…ashes.  Pretty grim, isn’t it?  In a week a lot has happened on this “Silent Planet” (C.S.Lewis).  It is grim right now in Japan.  It is grim in Libya.  It is grim in the abortuaries of our free land.  Ashes and the silence of death.  “For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, fornication, theft, murder, adultery, coveting, wickedness, deceit, licentiousness, envy, slander, pride, foolishness.   All these evil things come from within, and they defile a man.”—Jesus Christ recorded in St. Mark 7: 21-23.  Pretty grim, isn’t it?  We are pretty good at blocking out the stench but only for awhile with the posies of “positive thinking”, “purpose-driven living”, etc. and ad nauseam. Those ‘posies’ are only a cover-up. Ashes, ashes we all fall down. Christ Jesus is the revelation of death and so He is revelation of life, the Life of all the living and the blessed hope of the dead in Christ.

The Black Plague is with us still.  The man and the woman, Adam and Eve, wanted to be like God, “knowing good and evil”.  They wanted to control good and evil.  Mortal man can not do so.   The LORD punished them and the LORD said to Adam:  In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread till you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken; you are dust, and to dust you shall return. Sin is fairly grim:  war, violence, STDs, AIDS, divorce, ‘hooking up’, anger, malice, evil thoughts, adultery, idolatry… it’s all the news supposedly fit to print, as The New York Times states.  “Dust to dust, ashes to ashes”:  those are the Biblical words spoken by a pastor at the grave.  On Ash Wednesday you heard me say as you received the sign of the cross of ashes: Remember that you are dust and to dust you shall return.  All fall down.  But there is more news than the Times publishes:  the good news of Jesus Christ, the LORD Himself entering into the valley of the shadow of death.  Lent is the  sinners’ journey to His Cross, in the risen Lord!

“Beat down Satan lower and lower and lift up Christ higher and higher” That is part of a hymn sung by Lutherans in Papua, New Guinea.  We can sing it because Jesus Christ has done the heavy lifting:  our sins in His Body on the Tree of the Cross.  It is ashes on the forehead but it is the Sign of the Cross.  There is only One Who could literally cross the abyss from the Holy LORD to sinners in rebellion:  the One Who became our dust and ashes.  Jesus Christ is the second Adam, the man from Heaven.  (See 1 Corinthians 15:  45-49)  “In this Christian Church, He fully forgives my sins and sins of all believers.” (From Martin Luther’s explanation of the 3rd article of the Creed).  And if sin weighs you down, come to Jesus Christ where and when He said He will be:  This is My Body, This is My Blood.  If sins weighs you down, (and Satan wants to beat you lower and lower to drive you away from the Lord), pastors are called to hear confession in utter confidentiality  and offer the Lord’s own forgiveness to you personally in your ears and in your hearts (see St. John 20:  22-23;  1 John 1: 8-10). If death has undone you (T.S.Eliot), the last enemy to be destroyed (1 Corinthians 15:26), and enemies do not necessarily play fairly and death undid God. In the middle of the ashes, there is the Cross.  In the midst of death, there is Life.

Lent means literally ‘springtime’ This is the time for spring cleaning of the most important house you have:  your body and soul. Your body is temple of the Holy Spirit. (See 1 Corinthians 6: 19)  Repent and turn to the Lord your God for He is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love (see Joel 2: 13).

Let us pray…

1 Blessed is the one whose transgression is forgiven,
whose sin is covered.
2Blessed is the man against whom the LORD counts no iniquity,
and in whose spirit there is no deceit.

3For when I kept silent, my bones wasted away
through my groaning all day long.
4For day and night your hand was heavy upon me;
my strength was dried up as by the heat of summer.
Selah

5I acknowledged my sin to you,
and I did not cover my iniquity;
I said, “I will confess my transgressions to the LORD,”
and you forgave the iniquity of my sin.

Psalm 32

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