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Archive for October 15th, 2013

“…The LORD, The LORD God, merciful and gracious, longsuffering, and abundant in goodness and truth”   (Exodus 34:6, KJV)

 The translation of 1 Corinthians 13: 4 is usually:  “Love is patient…”   The word for “patient” is the Greek: makrothuma.   Another rendering of makrothuma and its related words is “long-suffering”.  In the lessons for the upcoming Sunday (Pentecost 22, year C in the Sunday Lectionary, 10/20/13), a form of  “long-suffering” is in our Lord’s parable of the Persistent Widow,  Luke 18: 1-8.  The King James Version renders the verse,  “And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?”  “Bear long with them” is a form of makrothuma, that is, the Lord long-suffers with His people as they are invited and called by the Lord to consistent and daily prayer to Him.  Then in the Epistle reading, 2 Timothy 3: 14—4: 15, 4: 2, the Apostle  encourages his fellow pastor, “…preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience (long-suffering, makrothuma) and teaching.”

 Rev. Lockwood in his commentary on 1 Corinthians states that makrothuma,

“…is marked “not so much in the expression as in the extension of emotion, the drawing out, taming, literally the ‘lengthening’ (makro-) of emotion.  The Christian is not short-tempered, but longsuffering with others.” 

Christian long-suffering is not a self-cultivated virtue, it is part of the fruit of the Holy Spirit, Galatians 5: 22.  Makrothuma comes from and has it’s roots in the Lord’s long-suffering, bearing long with us all.  St. Paul knew that: “Howbeit for this cause I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might shew forth all long-suffering, for a pattern to them which should hereafter believe on him to life everlasting.(1 Timothy 1: 16) It is clear that the Lord’s encouragement in the upcoming Gospel reading to prayer is likewise rooted and grounding in the Lord’s makrothuma

Long-suffering is so needed in this short-tempered world we live in.  Again, Rev. Lockwood comments on 1 Corinthians 13: 4, love is long-suffering: 

“In the fast-paced, achievement-oriented world entering the third millennium, when the spirit of the age tempts churches to look for quick and impressive results, it is salutary to reflect on the priority Paul accords to the love which expresses itself in being longsuffering, a love that can wait (cf. 1 Cor 1:7; 11:33; James 5:7-8).”

Even though the lessons for the upcoming Sunday do not mention love, I assert that “long-suffering” is almost a synonym for the divine love/charity, the Lord’s perfect makrothumia.  A love that can wait:

For God alone, O my soul, wait in silence, for my hope is from him. Psalm 62: 5

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